Joachim Hartstene House, 1803, Savannah

This house was rebuilt in 1964 incorporating many of the boards and other architectural features of the original. The only Joachim Hartstene I’ve been able to locate in Savannah records was born in Germany in 1732, with no date of death given. I’ll update when I have more information.

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

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Henry Willink Cottage, 1845, Savannah

The home of Henry Frederick Willink is one of many early Savannah landmarks that have been moved to the vicinity of East St. Julian Street. Willink was the son of a successful German immigrant, Frederick Henry Willink. He was born in Savannah in either 1825 or 1827; the date and location of his death are unknown. After time spent at the Chatham Academy, the younger Willink apprenticed at his father’s shipyard before moving to New York to improve his skills. Willink returned to Savannah in 1851 to start his own shipyard. [His home, originally located near Oglethorpe Aveune at the intersection of Price and Perry Streets, is said to have been built in 1845, but since he didn’t return to Savannah until 1851, there is some debate about the date].

By the outset of the Civil War, his business, Willink & Miller, was in full swing garnering commissions to build the gunboat Macon, as well as the ironclads Savannah and Milledgeville. After the war, he did quite well with other shipbuilding projects, as well as a wrecking  business and a marine railway on Hutchinson Island. From at least 1864 to 1877-79, Willink served as a Savannah alderman, but it is unclear if he served consecutive terms. Little beyond this time is known.

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

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Major Charles Oddingsells House, 1797, Savannah

Revolutionary War veteran Major Charles Oddingsells (1754-1810) came to Savannah as a young man, and he soon became a prominent planter and state legislator. He owned land all around Savannah but spent most of his time on Skidaway Island, where he died at the age of 56. He and wife Sarah Livingston Oddingsells had two children, neither of whom lived to adulthood.

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

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Federal Cottage, Circa 1820, Savannah

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

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Federal Style House, Circa 1806, Savannah

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

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John David Mongin House, 1797, Savannah

One of just a handful of 18th-century houses remaining in Savannah, the Mongin House (known for a time as the Capital Dwelling House and now known as the Mongin-Carswell House) was relocated here from another lot on Warren Square and remodeled to its present condition in 1964. Mongin (1763-1833) set about building it as soon as he arrived in Savannah from Daufuskie Island SC. He was a successful merchant but records of his industry in Savannah are quite sparse.

The house also served as a hospital during the 1876 yellow fever outbreak and a rectory for Christ Church.

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

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Eppinger-Lane House, 1821-23, Savannah

Built by James Eppinger (1790-1871) between 1821-23, this Federal style home was moved to its present location on Warren Square from West Perry Street. Eppinger later left Savannah for Pike County, in west central Georgia, and served as an attorney, Georgia legislator, and judge. He was the son of John Eppinger, Sr. (1765-1823), a brickmaker and bricklayer who built what may have been the first brick house in Savannah (a public house at 110 Oglethorpe Avenue built before 1764).

Peter Meldrim, who later became a judge, lived in this house as a youth during the Civil War. Judge Meldrim was later the owner of the iconic Green-Meldrim House, which served as General Sherman’s Savannah headquarters.

Photo by Frances Benjamin Johnston, no date, Historic American Buildings Survey, Courtesy Library of Congress

This view was likely made in the late 1930s, when the house was still located at West Perry Street. The front stairs and shortened chimneys are the only notable differences in its appearance.

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

 

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