Tag Archives: Brunswick GA

National Association of Letter Carriers Branch 313, Brunswick

It appears that this structure is no longer in use. The National Association of Letter Carriers is a labor union of city mail carriers, if my understanding is correct.

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Queen Anne House, Brunswick

Brunswick Old Town Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Queen Anne House, 1889, Brunswick

Brunswick Old Town Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Folk Victorian House, 1895, Brunswick

It’s obvious that the porch, in its present configuration, is a later addition to this house. I’m unsure as to its original style; the date of 1895 is from a resource survey and may only be a guess. I hope to learn more.

Brunswick Old Town Historic District, National Register of Historic Places

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Shotgun Houses, Brunswick

With the growing popularity of small houses, shotgun houses have become hot properties in the broader real estate market. Quite a few survive in varying states of repair throughout Brunswick’s historic African-American neighborhood and instead of being seen as blight should be an opportunity for affordable historic housing. They were likely built from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Central Hallway House, 1890, Brunswick

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Colored Memorial School, 1923, Brunswick

In 1870, the Freedmen’s School was established as the first public school for African-Americans in Brunswick. Colored Memorial High School, designed by Cloister architect Francis L. Abreu, was built adjacent to the Freedmen’s School in 1923* and named to honor African-American veterans of World War I. The Freedmen’s School was replaced by Risley High School in 1936 and served the community until 1955 when a new Risley High School was built elsewhere. It was named Risley School, for Captain Douglas Gilbert Risley, who advocated for the school as the head of the Freedmen’s Bureau.

*- The 1922 date on the building is the date the cornerstone was laid by Dr. H. R. Butler.

National Register of Historic Places

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Ahmaud Arbery Mural, Brunswick

Today, Ahmaud Arbery should be celebrating his 27th birthday with his family and loved ones, but on 3 February 2020, while jogging in a “white” neighborhood, he became yet another needless victim of racial violence. Unarmed, he was killed in cold blood by a retired law enforcement officer who apparently took offense to the mere presence of an athletic young black man in his neighborhood. This man presumed that Arbery’s race made him a suspect in a spate of recent robberies and acted as judge, jury, and executioner. To make matters worse, the local district attorney didn’t even think Arbery’s death met the definition of murder and charges weren’t brought against the perpetrators until it became a national news story. At this writing, the killer’s son and another man have also been charged not only with murder, but with hate crimes. As a white man, I am disgusted by the racists who committed the crime and the legal system’s abject but unsurprising failure.

The whole affair makes me angry but it’s nice to see this mural in the heart of Brunswick’s African-American community, on Albany Street. It was painted by Brunswick-born Miami artist Marvin Weeks and aims to educate and bring together all who deplore this inexcusable crime. The structure on which it is painted will soon become an African-American cultural center.

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U. S. Picric Acid Plant Ruins, Circa 1917, Brunswick

Jim Morrison graffiti, U. S. Picric Acid Plant, Brunswick

Known as “The Factory that Never Was”, this place looks more like something one would encounter under a freeway in New York or Los Angeles than in Coastal Georgia.

As America entered World War I in 1917, construction began on a factory at the site with the purpose of manufacturing picric acid, then vital to the manufacture of explosives.

It was to employ 5000 during the construction process and 6000 during operation and promised an economic boom for the community.

But the signing of the Versailles Treaty on 11 November 1918 put an end to the war and an end to the U. S. Picric Acid Plant in Brunswick.

Construction was halted immediately and the site was abandoned, just a month shy of completion.

It’s been suggested that the remains seen here were multi-level, built for the separation of chemicals used in the process.

Over the years large sections were demolished and this is all that remains, to my knowledge.

A partial chimney, visible from I-95, was also part of the operation. (Not pictured).

It’s suggested by some that another section remains nearby in the woods, overgrown to the point of obliteration, but I’m not looking for them so I cannot confirm either way.

 

 

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George’s Bait, Glynn County

Thousands of tourists pass by this sign regularly without giving it much notice. It’s on the southbound side of the Torras Causeway and is inconvenient if you’re heading onto the island. But legions of local fishermen will tell you George’s Bait is the best place to get bait in all of Glynn County.

The late George Bennett began a bait business on the other side of the Torras Causeway in 1953 which quickly earned a reputation as the best in the area. In the 1970s, with the four-laning of the causeway, the business moved here, to this tiny hammock in the marsh between Brunswick and St. Simons Island. Shirley Bennett, her son, daughter, and other relatives have kept the business thriving over the years.

 

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