Tag Archives: Ghost Towns of Coastal Georgia

Mid River School, 1890, Burnt Fort

Located adjacent to Burnt Fort Church, this schoolhouse was moved by oxcart in 1918 from the nearby Mid River community. Closed in 1922 and in disrepair for many decades, it was saved through the efforts of Stokes Davis and the Burnt Fort Chapel, Cemetery & Historical Association around 2001.

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Filed under -CAMDEN COUNTY, Burnt Fort GA

Galilee Baptist Church, 1954, Brookman

Galilee Baptist Church Brookman GA Brunswick Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

This historic congregation was founded by Reverend Jupiter Gilliard on 23 October 1891. The first deacons of the church were London Gilliard, Charles Harris, Baker Stafford, Sr., and Hector Blue. The original church building was replaced with this one in 1954, during the pastorate of Reverend Robert J. Leggett. The cornerstone displays the cipher of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall,  Grand Lodge, Free & Accepted Masons, Jurisdiction of Georgia.

Reverend Gilliard’s great-great-great grandchildren operate Gilliard Farms, a Georgia Centennial Farm on the adjacent property. It’s been in the family since 1874 and is one of the most important African-American farms in Georgia, due to its history and longevity.

 

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Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, Brookman GA

Lula & Arthur Wright House, Circa 1900, Brookman

Brookman GA Lula & Arthur Wright House Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Lula & Arthur Wright built this once-grand Folk Victorian around the turn of the last century. When surveyed for Glynn County in 2009, the house still retained a front porch with hand-carved Queen Anne posts. When I found it the other day, the porch had collapsed and the yard was overgrown. It will be a real loss, as it represents a more accomplished architecture than is usually associated with rural black communities of its day.

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Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, Brookman GA

Tarboro Mercantile

Tarboro Mercantile General Store Feed Seed Country Store Camden County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2014

Tarboro is an isolated community in Camden County’s interior, near White Oak.

 

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Filed under -CAMDEN COUNTY, Tarboro GA

Fort Frederica, 1736, St. Simons Island

Fort Frederica is just three years younger than Georgia itself. It represents a time when the colony was a buffer between British South Carolina and Spanish Florida, and was headquarters to Georgia’s founder, General James Oglethorpe during the War of Jenkins’ Ear. The small section of the tabby fort that remains contained the magazine, and is in relatively good condition. It’s maintained by the National Park Service as Fort Frederica National Monument. If you come in summer bring bug spray and lots of water, though the fountain at the interpretive office has the coldest and best water on St. Simons.

The view above shows Fort Frederica from the riverside, with a 29-pound English cannon of the period.

The view above shows the magazine and the two below show the interior.

This bronze plaque was placed in memory of James Oglethorpe by the Georgia Society of Colonial Dames in 1904. The supporting text reads: This remnant is all that time has spared of the citadel of the town of Frederica built by General Oglethorpe A. D. 1736 as an outpost against the Spaniards in Florida.

National Register of Historic Places

 

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Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, Frederica GA, St. Simons Island GA

Frederica Burying Ground, St. Simons Island

No one buried here is known today. The few remaining crypts are in critical condition.

 

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Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, Frederica GA, St. Simons Island GA

Frederica Homesites, St. Simons Island

The images below illustrate archaeological excavations made at the site of the town of Frederica, on St. Simons Island. Frederica was planned by Georgia’s founder, General James Oglethorpe, who preferred it to Savannah. It was named to honor Frederick, Prince of Wales, the son of King George II. Integral as a military outpost against the Spanish in its early days, the town fell into decline after the Battle of Bloody Marsh and was largely abandoned by 1755.  Frederica  survived a fire in 1758, but soon thereafter, was all but forgotten. All homes below are thought to have been built between 1736-1741 and represent the most important evidence of Georgia’s early European settlement.

This is thought to be the homesite of Francis Moore, who served as General Oglethorpe’s secretary, town recorder, and keepers of the King’s stores. He and Oglethorpe were often at odds and when Moore returned to England in 1743 he published an account of the founding of Frederica, A Voyage to Georgia.

This is believed to have been the site of the home of Lieutenant Primrose Maxwell of Oglethorpe’s Regiment. Lieutenant Maxwell took part in the 1740 expedition against the Spanish at St. Augustine and was one of the pallbearers at the funeral of Chief Tomochichi in Savannah.

John Calwell and his family lived at this site and made the finest soaps and candles in the town of Frederica, which were exported to New York and Philadelphia. Calwell was also “Conservator of the Peace” for the town.

Daniel Cannon is thought to have lived at this location. Cannon was perhaps the finest builder in Frederica and notably made the oars for Oglethorpe’s 1740 expedition against the Spanish at St. Augustine.

Archaeologists believe this home was destroyed during the Great Town Fire of 1758. Captain James McKay, who acted as Oglethorpe’s commanding officer during the General’s 1743 attack on St. Augustine, likely lived here, after baker Will Allen and carpenter Thomas Sumner.

This was the homesite of one of Frederica’s first settlers, Samuel Perkins. Perkins was a coachmaker and while renowned for his skill, was in constant conflict with General Oglethorpe and was “persecuted out of the colony” in May 1741. He settled in Charleston, South Carolina.

On this site were located two houses which shared a common wall, much in the style of English rowhouses of the day.
Samuel Davison lived in the house in the foreground and operated a tavern, made gunstocks, and served as town constable. Charles Wesley called Davison “my good Samaritan”.

Dr. Thomas Hawkins lived in the other section and served as Regimental Surgeon, as well as town doctor, apothecary, and magistrate. He and his wife Beatre were constantly quarreling with the Davisons, who left Frederica in 1741. Beatre even threatened to kill Reverend John Wesley with a pair of scissors and a pistol in this house.

National Register of Historic Places

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Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, Frederica GA, St. Simons Island GA