Tag Archives: Slave Construction in Georgia

Ruins of William Carnochan’s Sugar Mill, Circa 1800, Tolomato Island

Tolomato Island GA William Carnochan Sugar Mill Ruins Tabby Walls Palmettos Early Industry Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Located along the banks of Crum Creek, William Carnochan’s sugar mill was an important component of his nearby rum distillery. Like the distillery, the ruins of the sugar mill have survived for over 200 years and are evidence of some of Georgia’s first industrial efforts. It is important to note that these structures and the industries they supported were built and often staffed by enslaved people. Residents of Tolomato Island have worked hard to stabilize these ruins.

Tolomato Island GA William Carnochan Sugar Mill Ruins Tabby Walls Early Industry Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Though vegetation has grown inside the ruins, the durability of tabby as a building material is evident in this and the following images. These structures were built when President John Adams was in office.

Tolomato Island GA William Carnochan Sugar Mill Ruins Early 1800s Tabby Walls Palmettos Early Industry Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Tolomato Island GA William Carnochan Sugar Mill Ruins Tabby Walls Palmettos Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

For images of Tolomato Island residents and volunteers at work cleaning up the ruins, visit here.

Tolomato Island GA William Carnochan Sugar Mill Ruins Tabby Walls Endangered Landmark Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Tolomato Island GA William Carnochan Sugar Mill Ruins Tabby Walls Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

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Filed under --MCINTOSH COUNTY GA--, Tolomato Island GA

South End House-Reynolds Mansion, 1810 & 1925, Sapelo Island

Built of tabby as South End House by Roswell King for Thomas Spalding in 1810, this grand mansion has weathered many changes in its history. The skill of the slave laborers who constructed it was put to the test during the Hurricane of 1824, which it survived.

It was damaged and looted during the Civil War and fell into a state of ruin.

Automobile magnate Howard Coffin purchased the property in 1911 and Detroit architect Albert Kahn completed a reconstruction of South End House in 1925, transforming it into one of the grandest residences on the Georgia coast. During Coffin’s ownership of the island, many prominent visitors were guests in the home, including President Herbert Hoover and Charles Lindbergh.

Coffin sold the home to tobacco heir R. J. “Dick” Reynolds, Jr., in 1934. An expansion of the house was undertaken by prominent architect Phillip Trammell Shutze in 1938. Shutze commissioned Athos Menaboni to paint a series of murals and a “circus room”. When Reynolds died in 1964, the process of selling the house to the state of Georgia, as well as the vast majority of the island, was initiated.

Owned by the Department of Natural Resources today, it serves as a lodge and event venue for small groups.

 

 

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Filed under --MCINTOSH COUNTY GA--, Sapelo Island GA