Tag Archives: The Civil War in Coastal Georgia

Horton-duBignon House, Circa 1736, Jekyll Island

Dates on these ruins range from circa 1736 to 1742. Built by Major William Horton, General James Oglethorpe’s second-in-command, the structure employed the preferred building material of Coastal Georgia, tabby. While Oglethorpe was at Fort Frederica, Horton kept a small military outpost on Jekyll. The vast fields around the house were planted with rye, barley and hops for use in Horton’s brewery, and the area around the house was originally known as Rye Patch. Beer was the only alcoholic beverage allowed in the colony at the time and Horton’s brewery supplied the soldiers at Fort Frederica. In 1742, after the Battle of Bloody Marsh on nearby St. Simons, Spanish troops burned the house. Upon Oglethorpe’s return to England in 1743, Horton became commander of military forces in the colony. He died in Savannah in 1748.

Fleeing the French Revolution in 1791, Le Sieur Christophe Poulain de la Houssaye duBignon and family purchased Jekyll Island and restored this house, adding wooden wings. The duBignons raised Sea Island cotton and indigo, but the Civil War brought their economic model to an end. Union soldiers destroyed most of the house, as well.

Upon their purchase of the island in 1888, the Jekyll Island Club reinforced the ruins of the Horton-duBignon House and placed a wall around the old duBignon Cemetery. Taylor Davis notes that a 2004 stabilization has resulted in the “splotchy” appearance of the structure. Like many of Georgia’s tabby ruins, the Horton-duBignon House has had multiple identities over time. As late as the 1940s, tourist postcards were identifying it as the site of an “old Spanish mission”.  This was apparently a widely held belief about most such ruins on the coast until modern scholarship confirmed historic identities in the last half of the 20th century.

National Register of Historic Places

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, Jekyll Island GA

Henry Willink Cottage, 1845, Savannah

The home of Henry Frederick Willink is one of many early Savannah landmarks that have been moved to the vicinity of East St. Julian Street. Willink was the son of a successful German immigrant, Frederick Henry Willink. He was born in Savannah in either 1825 or 1827; the date and location of his death are unknown. After time spent at the Chatham Academy, the younger Willink apprenticed at his father’s shipyard before moving to New York to improve his skills. Willink returned to Savannah in 1851 to start his own shipyard. [His home, originally located near Oglethorpe Aveune at the intersection of Price and Perry Streets, is said to have been built in 1845, but since he didn’t return to Savannah until 1851, there is some debate about the date].

By the outset of the Civil War, his business, Willink & Miller, was in full swing garnering commissions to build the gunboat Macon, as well as the ironclads Savannah and Milledgeville. After the war, he did quite well with other shipbuilding projects, as well as a wrecking  business and a marine railway on Hutchinson Island. From at least 1864 to 1877-79, Willink served as a Savannah alderman, but it is unclear if he served consecutive terms. Little beyond this time is known.

Savannah Historic District, National Historic Landmark

1 Comment

Filed under -CHATHAM COUNTY, Savannah GA

Orange Hall, Circa 1830, St. Marys

orange-hall-st-marys-ga-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-coastal-georgia-usa-2016

Though the specific date for construction has been lost, Orange Hall is believed to have had its origins as a much smaller structure (possibly incorporated into the present one) in the late 1820s. [I’m only using the 1830 date because that’s the present “accepted date” settled on by St. Marys. As a matter of full disclosure, I don’t believe it can be accurately assigned]. It was named for the sour orange trees which were once planted around the lawn. Oral tradition suggests it was built for Jane Wood Pratt (first wife of the Reverend Horace Pratt), by her father, John Wood. Mr. Wood was a Loyalist who fled Savannah during the Revolution and likely began building the house upon his return to America, circa 1826. John Wood and his daughter both died in 1829, which is why the date for the house is fixed around the time, according to research completed in 1973 for the nomination of the property to the National Register of Historic Places. The key to the history of the house as it is known today, however, can be traced to its purchase by James Smith from the Pratt estate in 1846. By 1856 when Smith sold it to Francis Adams, its tax value had risen sharply, indicating improvements which likely gave Orange Hall its present appearance.

One other note of historical significance: the house is said to have been the headquarters of the 9th Maine Regiment during raids in the area in early 1863. A regimental history of Company H of the 9th Maine by Lieutenant Aaron H. Chase mentions St. Marys but not Orange Hall. As many of the raids in this area were clandestine in nature, it is unclear what role the house actually played in these exercises. Like the date of the house, this bears further research.

st-marys-ga-orange-hall-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-coastal-georgia-usa-2016

Orange Hall is now a house museum and event space.

National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under -CAMDEN COUNTY, St. Marys GA

Christ Church, Frederica, 1884, St. Simons Island

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Founded in 1808, Christ Church did not build a permanent house of worship until 1820, due largely to economic troubles stemming from the War of 1812.  The first structure stood until the Civil War, when Union troops damaged it so badly that members were forced to meet in their homes until the present structure was built in 1884.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Altar Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

The interior of Christ Church is breathtaking. Shipbuilders built the new cruciform church to resemble an inverted ship’s hull, symbolic of the ship of faith  There are various stained glass windows throughout.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Detail of Stained Glass Old Chapel Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

One of two windows in the vestibule of Christ Church dedicated to the rector of the present structure, this one features the original antebellum church, as well as the present structure. The other window is dedicated to Anson Greene Phelps Dodge, who established  the Dodge Home for Boys (1895-1956) and endowed the All Saints Cathedral in Allahabad, India, 1884. Other windows, including one made by Tiffany Studios, feature typical but beautifully rendered Christian iconography.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Stained Glass Window Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Christ Church Cemetery, Frederica

Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island Churchyard Cemetery Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

The church and graveyard are among the most visited and beloved places on St. Simons. It’s the final resting place of many Georgia pioneers and veterans of nearly every war dating from the American Revolution onward. The following photos represent just a small sampling of the cemetery.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Cemetery Llewellin & Ann Harris Pioneer Settlers Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Lewellin Harris (1742? – 15 December 1808)

Ann Harris (1759? – 17 April 1815)

This stone is erected by Henry Allen & John Benjamin Harris, to the memory of their Father, Lewellin Harris, an Old & respectable Inhabitant of St. Simons Island, who departed this transitory life on said Island Dec. 15, 1808, Aged 66.  Also Their Mother Ann Harris, wife of Lewellin Harris, who departed this life on the same Island, April 17, 1815, Aged 56.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Cemetery Tabby Maousoleum Hazzard Family Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

The Hazzard family owned West Point and Pike’s Bluff plantations on St. Simons. This tabby mausoleum is one of the most interesting gravesites in Christ Church cemetery. The date A. D. 1813 is inscribed on a bronze marker at the foot of the mausoleum and is a bit mysterious. This history of the Hazzards was written by Carey C. Giudici: The Hazzard family was one of the Island’s most colorful families. Originally from South Carolina, Revolutionary War veteran Colonel William Hazzard moved to the area and purchased West Point in 1818. This plantation, just north of Frederica, became the home of Hazzard’s oldest son Colonel William Wigg Hazzard. Nine years later the younger son, Dr. Thomas Fuller Hazzard bought the Pike’s Bluff property that adjoined West Point to the north. The family now owned much of the north end of St. Simons Island. Very active in church activities, they also served as representatives to Georgia’s House of Representatives, enjoyed competing in their racing boats Shark and Comet, and frequently went hunting with their pack of deer hounds. Both were also noted writers; William Wigg Hazzard’s 1825 history of Glynn County is still in print. In 1838 a boundary dispute resulted in Dr. Thomas Hazzard shooting a young neighbor, John Armstrong Wylly. Tradition has it that although Dr. Hazzard was acquitted of any crime, the family was so ostracized by the other planter families that they built their own family chapel on West Point–which became known as “The Pink Chapel” because of the lichen-based discoloration on its tabby walls. Colonel Hazzard’s son, Captain William Miles Hazzard, commanded the local Confederate Army detachment during the Civil War. With nine troops and a slave named Henry, he burned the U.S. Navy headquarters on the occupied St. Simons.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Cyrus Dart Revolutionary Veteran Drowning Victim Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Private Cyrus Dart (11 June 1764 – 29 June 1817)

Connecticut Continental Line, Revolutionary War. Drowned Off St. Simons Island.

Cyrus Dart was born in Haddon, Connecticut. In 1782, he enlisted as  Private in the 1st Connecticut Regiment Continental Line and served for one year. After the Revolutionary War, he completed medical studies in Connecticut and in 1792 moved to Glynn County where he operated a medical practice in the town of Frederica. In 1796, Cyrus married Ann Harris and was appointed Surgeon in the U. S. Army, stationed at Coleraine in Camden County. In 1802 he resigned from the Army and was appointed Quarantine Officer for the Port of Brunswick and served in that position until his death. The untimely accident that took his life at age 53 was caused when his rowboat capsized as he and his son, Urbanus, were enroute to inspect an inccoming vessel. (Source: Marshes of Glynn Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution)

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Cemetery Sarah Frewin Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Sarah Frewin (1811? – 25 October 1824)

Daughter of James & Elizabeth Frewin, aged 13 years.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island 2

Oak & Acorn Garland, Headstone of John Couper, one of many Coupers who worshiped here. Couper’s Point, sight of St. Simons Light, was deeded to the U. S. by John Couper in 1804 for the construction of a lighthouse.

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Cemetery Major William Page Revolutionary War Officer Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing South Georgia USA 2015

Major William Page (2 January 1764 – 12 January 1827)

William Page was born at Page’s Point, Prince William Parish, South Carolina. His father, Thomas Page, sided with the Loyalists in the American rebellion. When he died in 1780, his son joined Francis Marion to fight in the irregular combat in the South Carolina countryside. As a result, the Tories burned his house at Page’s Point. In 1781, he married Hannah Timmons. After the war, William Page moved to Georgia and in 1804 purchased land on St. Simons Sound, which he named “Retreat”. In total, the Retreat Plantation exceeded 2000 acres; and on it he grew prized long-staple cotton. In 1808, he became a major in the 7th Battalion of the Glynn County Militia, a position he held for the rest of his life. (Source: Marshes of Glynn Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution)

Captain Alexander Campbell Wylly Christ Church Frederica Cemetery Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Captain Alexander Campbell Wylly (1759? – 31 May 1833)

A Georgia Historical Commission Marker regarding Captain Wylly Road on nearby Jekyll Island explains the two Captain Wyllys:

There were two Captain Wyllys in the history of Jekyll. It is believed the road was named for Charles Spalding Wylly (1836- 1923), Captain in the Confederate Army, 1st Georgia Regulars, a descendant of Clement Martin, who was granted, on April 5, 1768, Jekyll Island by the Crown. His grandfather, Captain William Campbell Wylly (born at Belfast, Ireland), remaining loyal to the British General Provost crossed the St. Marys and marched on Savannah. After the Revolution he moved to Nassau and was made Governor of New Providence. In 1807 he returned to Georgia, lived first on Jekyll, then St. Simons. Captain Alexander Campbell Wylly was born in Belfast in 1759, moving to Savannah from there.

Captain Charles Spalding Wylly 1st Georgia Regulars Christ Church Frederica Cemetery Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Captain Charles Spalding Wylly

 

Historic Christ Church Frederica St Simons Island GA Cemetery Henrietta Stevens Currie Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Henrietta Stevens  (Mrs. John C.) Currie (28 February 1855 – 15 April 1937)

Christ Church Frederica Cemetery Author Eugenia Price Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Eugenia Price (22 June 1916 – 28 May 1996)

World-famous for her historical novels set on the Georgia coast in the early days of white settlement, Eugenia Price was largely responsible for the national attention Christ Church has received in the ensuing years. My mother has always been a big fan of her writing. From the Lighthouse trilogy and the Georgia trilogy to the Florida trilogy and the Savannah quartet, most of her books are still in print or readily available on the coast, especially on St. Simons.

http://www.christchurchfrederica.org/about-us/21-about-us/about/74-history.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, St. Simons Island GA

Fort Pulaski, 1847, Cockspur Island

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Evidence of Civil War Bombardment Parrot Rifles Moat Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

President James Madison called for the construction of a fort on Cockspur Island as a reaction to the War of 1812. Though construction wouldn’t begin until 1829, the need to protect Savannah from foreign invasion was an ever-present concern.

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Antebellum Construction Third System Fortress Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Antebellum Third System Fortress Civil War Seige Moat Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Designed by General Simon Bernard, Fort Pulaski was built by Captain J. F. K. Mansfield of the Army Corps of Engineers. Second Lieutenant Robert E. Lee was involved in the construction from 1829-31.

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Casemates Arches Parade Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

One of numerous Third System fortifications, Pulaski would prove an important testing ground for military resistance to new weaponry in the Civil War. The “holes” or pock marks in the side of the structure are the result of rifled cannon fire during the Union siege in the Battle of Fort Pulaski (10-11 April 1862). Pulaski’s inability to withstand this sort of firepower made such coastal fortifications obsolete and changed military architecture forever.

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Antebellum Arches Third System Fortress Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

The arched casemates surrounding the interior of the fort held large guns for defense.

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Antebellum Third System Fortress Civil War Seige Bunks Gun Port Embrasure Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

The guns were aimed through ports like these, and before the introduction of the Parrott rifle were an imposing defense.

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Antebellum Third System of Coastal Fortifications Gun Port Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Several re-created barracks such as the one seen below can be found in the complex.

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Antebellum Third System Fortress Bunks Quarters Civil War Seige Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Casemates Arches Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Fort Pulaski National Monument Cockspur Island GA Savannah Area Antebellum Arches Casemate Gun Cannon Third System Fortress Picture Image Photograph Copyright © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

National Register of Historic Places

http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/fort-pulaski

8 Comments

Filed under -CHATHAM COUNTY, Cockspur Island GA

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Black Union Reenactors Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Reenactors of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Encampment

On June 11, 1863 the seaport of Darien was vandalized and burned by Federal forces stationed on nearby St. Simons Island. The town was largely deserted, most of its 500 residents having sought refuge inland. Lost were public buildings, churches, businesses and most private residences. Conducting the raid were units comprised of among the first African-American troops to serve the Union cause, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteers under Col. Robert G. Shaw, and the 2nd South Carolina Volunteers under Col. James Montgomery. The burning of Darien, undefended and of little strategic importance, was one of the most controversial events of the Civil War. (Text of  historic marker placed by the Lower Altamaha Historical Society and the Georgia Historical Society in 2001). The movie Glory was based loosely on the story of the 54th Massachusetts.

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Union Reenactors at Tent by Darien River Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Union Reenactors 54th Massachusetts Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Young Reenactor in Uniform by River Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Large crowds were on hand to see reenactors demonstrating all aspects of Civil War camp life and techniques at the Darien Riverfront Park. The reenactors had as much fun as the visitors and it was a perfect day for such a commemoration. Even the “spirits” of the era were on display!

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Whiskeys Liquors Alcohol in Antique Style Bottles Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Union Reenactors Canon Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Union Reenactors Firing Canon Crew from Fort McAllister Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Union Reenactors Firing Canon Crew from Fort McAllister State Park Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

A canon crew from nearby Fort McAllister State Park was on hand, with hourly firings. This was certainly one of the more popular attractions of the day.

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Confederate Reenactors in Period Clothing in front of Adam Strain Building Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Missy Brandt and Will Wilson pose in front of the Adam Strain Building, which survived (with damage) the Burning of Darien and stands today as the oldest relic of the town’s early history.

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Ladies in Period Dress Waiting for Parade to Start Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Ladies in period dress provided a civilian aspect to the reenactment.

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Parade Union Reenactors 54th Massachusetts Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Union Reenactors Parading down Broad Street Downtown Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Crowd at Ceremonial Lighting of Torch Reenactment Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

At noon, uniformed reenactors paraded down Broad Street among enthusiastic crowds to the Adam Strain Building for a ceremonial torch lighting. It was nice to see such a huge turnout for this event.

150th Anniversary of the Burning of Darien GA Civil War Sesquicentennial Southern Heritage Vendors Confederate Flags Kitsch Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

The Burning of Darien Museum Visitors Viewing Artifacts McIntosh County GA Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

The new Darien Civil War Museum represents wonderful work by members of the McIntosh County Historic Preservation Commission and numerous volunteers. Harriet Langford reports that over 200 people visited the museum during the commemoration. The museum is located on 1st Street, just off U. S. Highway 17 and houses artifacts, including a recreation of the Garey family’s parlor (below), as it appeared before being sacked by Union troops in 1863.

The Burning of Darien Museum Garey Family Parlor Circa 1863 McIntosh County GA Picture Image Photograph © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

http://www.burningofdarien.com/

http://jacksonville.com/news/georgia/2013-05-19/story/historian-hopes-clear-union-colonels-name-observance-dariens-burning

 

12 Comments

Filed under -MCINTOSH COUNTY, Darien GA

Fort McAllister, 1861, Bryan County

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Fortification March to the Sea Picket Line Earthworks Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Located near the mouth of the Ogeechee River in Bryan County, Fort McAllister was a Confederate earthwork fortification. Named for Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Longworth McAllister, who owned the plantation at Genesis Point where the fort was sited in 1861, it provided Savannah’s southern defense against the U. S. Navy. During 1862 and 1863, Fort McAllister successfully repelled seven attacks by Union warships, including the ironclads USS Montauk and USS Passaic.  Fort McAllister’s commanding officer, Major John Gallie, was killed in one of the assaults.

Though the fort never fell to the Union Navy, the land assault of 13 December 1864 marked the end of Confederate control and thus the end of Sherman’s March to the Sea. The General himself observed the taking of Fort McAllister from atop the rice mill of the captured Cheves plantation, across the Ogeechee River. It served for the remainder of the war as a prison camp for Confederates captured along the northern part of the Georgia coast.

After many years of disrepair and natural reclamation, Henry Ford, who owned the property at the time, funded a complete restoration in the late 1930s. Today, it’s one of the best-preserved earthworks of the Confederacy and features a museum and hiking trails.

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Naval Fortification March to the Sea Earthen Defense Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Sesquicentennial Fortification March to the Sea Picket Line Earthworks Henry Ford Reconstruction Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Fortification March to the Sea Finale Earthworks Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Fortification March to the Sea Bunkers Munitions Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

The four images above look more like prehistoric Indian mounds than a stronghold of the Confederacy, but the earthen construction of Fort McAllister was largely responsible for its ability to successfully repel so many attacks by the Union Navy. Known as the central bombproof, this area in the middle of the fortification housed soldiers, provided medical care, and prepped and maintained the many canons and munitions necessary to the defense of the site.

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Fortification March to the Sea Hot Shot Oven Furnace for Fiery Canonballs Defense Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

The “hot shot” furnace (above) was used to heat canon balls to fire on attacking wooden vessels. Several sizes of these powerful guns were used in the defense of the fort

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Fortification March to the Sea Picket Line Earthworks Confederate Canon Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Confederate Ship Nashville Rattlesnake Recovered Rotary Engine Part Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

In 1863 the CSS Rattlesnake (formerly known as the CSS Nashville) took refuge in the Ogeechee River. After being grounded in mud during low tide, the Rattlesnake took heavy fire from Union naval vessels and was completely destroyed. Sections of the wreck were salvaged in 1960, including the engine component seen above.

Ogeechee River at Fort McAllister GA Bryan County Civil War Outpost March to the Sea Picture Image Photo © Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2013

National Register of Historic Places

Leave a comment

Filed under -BRYAN COUNTY, Fort McAllister GA