Forsyth Farmers’ Market, Savannah

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Fresh Georgia Peaches Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Every Saturday (from 9AM-1PM) year round, the South End of Forsyth Park is the place to be in Savannah. The Forsyth Farmers’ Market was founded in 2009 by six women who came together with the intention of supporting their common vision of a local food system that is good for the health of all people and the environment.  They merged with the existing Starland market and sought permission from the city to allow a farmers’ market in historic Forsyth Park. The first market was on 9 May 2009From the very beginning, the market has focused on food and food issues which is why it is a producer-only market (meaning all vendors have to be producing at least 75% of the products they sell)  and allows only food and plant vendors.  * from the Forsyth Farmers’ Market website

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Organic Green Beans Carrots Onions Potatoes Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Organic vendors from all over the Low Country bring a wide variety of wholesome vegetables.

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Organic Potatoes Onions Red Cabbage Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Fresh cut flowers, like these zinnias and sunflowers, are available in the spring and summer.

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Zinnias Sunflowers Fresh Cut Flowers Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Products made from local crops are also on offer, like Vegetable Kingdom’s popular Hot Chow Chow.

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Vegetable Kingdom Hot Chow Chow Photograph Copyriht Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Bell peppers, blackberries, and okra were in abundance when I was there.

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Organic Bell Peppers Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Organic Blackberries Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Fresh Organic Okra Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

All the vendors at the market accept cash, but if you’re bringing plastic, you have to buy tokens which are used like cash. They eliminate the “middle man”, i.e. the bank and its transaction fees. This way, vendors can concentrate on what’s most important: their wonderful produce and food items.

Forsyth Farmers Market Savannah GA Token Exchange Information Booth Photogaph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Visit them online for particulars, or better yet, make a point to visit them on any given Saturday! It’s an experience you won’t soon forget, and if you live near Savannah, you’ll likely return.

http://forsythfarmersmarket.com/

Chatham County, Georgia

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Needwood Baptist Church, 1885

Needwood Baptist Church New Hope Glynn County GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Portions of this church were originally built by freed slaves on nearby Broadfield (now Hofwyl-Broadfield) Plantation in the late 1870s, where it was known as Broadfield Baptist Church. It was removed to this location and took on its present appearance in 1885.  It’s one of the most important remaining African-American vernacular churches in Georgia and a familiar landmark to travelers along U.S. Highway 17. It’s just south of the McIntosh County line.

Glynn County, Georgia

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Old Brunswick City Hall, 1890

Brunswick GA City Hall Richardsonian Romanesque Landmark Alfred Eichberg Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Construction of Alfred S. Eichberg’s monumental Richardsonian Romanesque Brunswick City Hall began in 1889 and the building was open for business in 1890. The clock tower was added in 1893 and features some of the most fascinating gargoyles on any building in Georgia. Today it’s been properly restored and is available as an event space.

Brunswick GA City Hall Gargoyle Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

National Register of Historic Places

Brunswick, Georgia

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Hazel’s Cafe, Circa 1947

Hazel's Cafe & the Hazel & Thomas Floyd House South End Neighborhood St. Simons Island GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

I panicked this morning when I heard a rumor that Hazel’s had been demolished, but concerned friends on St. Simons quickly checked and let me know it wasn’t true. To many, this place is as much a symbol of the island’s history as the lighthouse or Fort Frederica. Located in the nearly forgotten African-American community of South End, Hazel’s was owned by Hazel and Thomas Floyd. Thomas, a veteran of World War II, settled here with his wife shortly after World War II and soon thereafter they started this business, which would be a staple of St. Simons life until it closed in 1978. (Their house is to the right in the photograph). With new homes and condos dotting the island today, it’s a nice step back to a time when St. Simons, like all of the Georgia coast, was anchored by small but thriving communities who looked to family and friends as well as the rich coastal waters surrounding them for sustenance and survival. Hazel was known to go crabbing in season and bring back her catch for the night’s special of deviled crab. I’m sure they were legendary dishes in their time. Melissa Lee  has an excellent tribute to this St. Simons icon here:

http://www.thepermanenttourist.com/hazels-cafe-2/

St. Simons Island, Georgia

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Union Brotherhood Society, 1932

Union Brotherhood Society Midway GA Liberty County Endangered African American Historic Site Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

William McKinley Walthour, Sr., founded the Union Brotherhood Society or “The Society” in March 1932 to help provide for the proper burial of Negro citizens. During this period of segregation and Jim Crow Laws, Negroes were uninsured and had to use homemade pine boxes to bury their loved ones. The organization collected dues of ten and twenty-five cents monthly from its members; enabling them to have death and health benefits. The Society with 34 members still exists in 2006 with death benefits of $140.00 and sickness benefits of $10.00. At funerals, the Society members dressed in black and white, wore badges and greeted each other as Brother and Sister. Anniversay celebrations, known as the “Society Turning Out,” had a worship program followed by fellowship, fun and games. The founding members were: William Walthour, Sr., Frank Baker, Willie Stevens, Joe Bowers, Wilhelmina Walthour, Beatrice Bowers, Gus Williams, Priscilla Maxwell, Rose Bell Roberts, Ben Maxwell, Sarah Jane Walthour, Joe Walthour, George Walthour Sr., William Brown, Rev. R.W. Monroe and Janie Stevens. Less than an acre of land was purchased and a building, structured similar to an old T-shaped church, was built by The Society members for their meetings and gatherings at this location in 1932. This monumment is a tribute to their unity, vision and community concern. Source: Historical marker placed in 2007 by the Liberty County Historical Society.

Union Brotherhood Society Midway GA Liberty County Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Such relics of the Jim Crow era are fading fast and are tangible evidence of a different world. It’s a shame to see this old building in such disrepair, but I’m glad Liberty County made the effort to mark this significant part of its history. (Though maps locate this at Midway, it’s a bit further inland).

Union Brotherhood Society Interior Midway GA Liberty County Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Liberty County, Georgia

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Oatland Island, Savannah

oatland-island-ga-retirement-home-brotherhood-of-railroad-conductors-1927-the-generals-daughter-john-travolta-movie-set-picture-image-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-photography-vanishing-coastal-georgia-usa-2015

Built in 1927 as a retirement home for the Brotherhood of Railroad Conductors, the “main building” today serves as an educational center for the surrounding Oatland Island Wildlife Center. It is quite typical of institutional architecture of its era and subsequently served as a Public Health Service hospital in World War II. Until being surplussed in 1973, it was used as a development laboratory by the Centers for Disease Control. The Chatham County Board of Education has owned it since then and it serves over 20,000 students and visitors each year as a wildlife education facility today. To movie buffs, the building may be familiar to viewers of the John Travolta movie, The General’s Daughter, as it was used as a set location. And Martha Barnes adds this interesting bit of Savannah trivia: People who read Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil will remember the main building as where Luther Driggers worked and actually developed the chemical used in today’s flea collars, but in the book he was always about to poison Savannah’s water supply.

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Carol Suttle, a Savannah native and Oatland’s most enthusiastic ambassador, contacted me several months ago about photographing the old water tower at the entrance to the center; it’s scheduled to be demolished and it’s one of her favorite structures on the island. Touring the island and its natural features with Carol and photographer Mike McCall was a real treat, and I hope to revisit in the future. Located just past downtown Savannah on the Islands Expressway (US 80), it’s often overlooked by tourists heading to Tybee Island but is well worth a visit! See the link at the end of this post for specifics about admission and other particulars.

oatland-island-ga-heritage-homesite-david-delk-gum-branch-liberty-county-1835-pioneer-farmhouse-reconstruction-relocated-1979-picture-image-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-coastal-georgia-usa-2015

David Delk, Jr., built this cabin in 1837 in the Taylor’s Creek community near Gum Branch in Liberty County. It was moved and reconstructed here by the Youth Conservation Corps in 1979. The layout is of the Scots/Irish or “shotgun” design (not to be confused with the more common and more recent shotgun “house”), a vernacular form common in early Georgia.

oatland-island-ga-heritage-homesite-pioneer-log-barn-reconstruction-picture-image-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-coastal-georgia-usa-2015

Martha Phillips Youngblood writes that the corn crib pictured above was originally owned by her grandfather, Thomas Hilton Phillips, and was moved here from Treutlen County.

Oatland Island GA Abandoned Barn Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Oatland Island GA CDC Predecessor Abandoned Utility Building Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

The two abandoned structures pictured above are remnants of the bureaucratic era on the island. A hand-crafted boat from the 1970s can also be seen on the property.

Oatland Island GA Savannah Abandoned Ship Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Gopher Tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus), as well as wolves and bison can be easily seen on the property.

oatland-island-ga-gopher-tortoise-savannah-ga-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-coastal-georgia-usa-2015

Beautiful Richardson Creek runs adjacent to the island.

oatland-island-ga-richardson-creek-atlantic-coastal-inlet-spartina-marsh-picture-image-photograph-copyright-brian-brown-vanishing-coastal-georgia-usa-2015

Richardson Creek at Oatland Island Savannah GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

 

http://internet.savannah.chatham.k12.ga.us/schools/oat/default.aspx

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60814-d1077850-Reviews-Oatland_Island_Wildlife_Center-Savannah_Georgia.html

Chatham County, Georgia

 

 

 

 

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Driftwood Beach

Driftwood Beach Entrance Jekyll Island GA Maritime Oak Forest Salt Wind Effects Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

To access Driftwood Beach, park in the small lot  just past the Villas-by-the-Sea condominiums. After walking through this maritime oak forest you’ll find a “boneyard” full of fallen trees, gradual victims to the ravages of wind and salt-spray. In springtime, you’ll see lots of thistle.

Driftwood Beach Thistle Jekyll Island GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

A short or long walk will reveal some of the most stunning scenery on the Georgia coast.

Driftwood Beach Jekyll Island GA Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Driftwood Beach Boneyard Jekyll Island GA Maritime Forest Erosion Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Driftwood Beach Jekyll Island GA Oak Boneyard Fallen Trees Maritime Forest Photograph Copyright Brian Brown Vanishing Coastal Georgia USA 2015

Jekyll Island, Georgia

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