Dead Peoples Things for Sale, Woodbine

This tongue-in-cheek sign for an antique store greets you just as you cross the Satilla River bridge into Woodbine on US 17. It may be odd but it definitely gets your attention. It has become somewhat of a landmark itself. (This is an older photo, but I believe the sign is still there).

 

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Filed under -CAMDEN COUNTY, Woodbine GA

Poteet Seafood, Brunswick

Passing by this rather plain metal building you might not even give it any notice, but to locals, it’s a landmark. Poteet Seafood has been a leading distributor of Wild Georgia Shrimp for over 35 years. I am passionate about documenting and promoting these places because the people behind them really are a vanishing breed. Due to the prevalence of pond-raised Asian shrimp and the lower price of that product, combined with higher fuel costs, it’s harder than ever for independent fishermen to survive. Though I personally don’t buy any imported shrimp, I understand that not everyone is lucky enough to live near the coast and have easy access to the product. But by all means, please buy Wild Georgia Shrimp whenever you can. If you live far from the coast and just have to have some, you can order from Poteet’s website, linked above.

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Filed under -GLYNN COUNTY, Brunswick GA

Walthourville International F & AM OES Johnson Lodge No. 37

Donated and built by John Walt, this was the meeting place of the International Free & Accepted Masons and Order of the Eastern Star, known as Johnson Lodge No. 37. It was an African-American lodge. A list of Walthourville’s historic resources in the most recent Liberty County Joint Comprehensive Plan dates it to circa 1845, but I believe this to be an error. If it was originally a white lodge, it could date to the antebellum era, but the style of construction doesn’t support that date. Furthermore, its African-American association precludes that date as such organizations and gathering places for blacks were illegal at the time. My guess is that it was built in the late 1800s. Whatever its history, it’s an important landmark and should be preserved.

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Filed under -LIBERTY COUNTY, Walthourville GA

Harris Neck Army Air Field, 1942

Today, it’s nothing more than weed-choked concrete and asphalt, but these barren strips within Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge played a part in civilian and military aeronautical history. Before its association with the military, Harris Neck was the site of an emergency landing strip featuring two sod runways and an 81′ beacon. It was built in 1930 and leased by the Department of Commerce. Serving the Richmond-Jacksonville air route, it was officially known as Harris Neck Intermediate Field Site #8. On 7 December 1941, after the attack on Pearl Harbor, guardsmen from Hunter Field in Savannah took over operations of the property. The site was already being used for aerial gunnery training. In 1943, Harris Neck became an auxiliary-base of Dale Mabry Field in Tallahassee and was assigned to the III Fighter Command.

Pilots at Harris Neck were trained on two types of fighter craft: the P-39 “Airacobra” and the P-40. The P-40 was known as the “Kitty Hawk” and was associated with Chenault’s “Flying Tigers” in China. In 1944, a hangar, warehouses, repair shops, barracks for 125 men, and a non-commisioned officers club were constructed from pre-fabricated material on site.

In September 1944, there were 575 enlisted personnel at Harris Neck, along with 129 officers, but by November, the number was greatly reduced, leading to its deactivation on 31 December 1944. The property was given to McIntosh County after the war for potential use as an airport, but this was never realized and mismanagement by the county led to its reversion to the federal government. It was acquired by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife (now the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service)  in 1962 for use as a refuge. It’s now known as Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge and the federal government has had a contentious presence ever since*.

*When the government expropriated the site in World War II, landowners were given two weeks to leave their properties. African-Americans owned 1102 acres of the original property while whites owned 1532. Families of both races felt their land was stolen, though token compensation was given. Many descendants believe the forced removal was mishandled and have mounted legal challenges for years.

Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge

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Filed under -MCINTOSH COUNTY, Harris Neck GA

First African Baptist Church, 1974, Harris Neck

First African Baptist Church of Harris Neck was organized by Reverend Andrew Neal in 1867.

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Filed under -MCINTOSH COUNTY, Harris Neck GA

One-Room Schoolhouse, 1852, Dorchester

From is construction in 1852 until the 1920s, this little one-room schoolhouse served students of Dorchester Village. It was located adjacent to the Dorchester Presbyterian Church and was all but lost when the Selectmen of the Midway Church and Society saved and relocated it to the “new” Dorchester School nearby. This photograph dates to 2011.

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Filed under -LIBERTY COUNTY, Dorchester GA

First Zion Baptist Church, 1971, Riceboro

Located on the opposite corner of the intersection of the E. B. Cooper Highway and Barrington Ferry Road from First African Baptist Church, First Zion was established by members of the “Mother Church” in 1870-1871 with the Reverend U. L. Houston as its first pastor. The present structure was built in 1971 during the pastorate of Reverend B. N. Jones. The churchyard is a beautiful spot shaded by old-growth oaks.

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Filed under -LIBERTY COUNTY, Riceboro GA